3 Tips for Parents Who Want to Be More Involved In Their Child’s Education

Improving student learning is the number one goal for teachers and school leaders. Parents play a major role in achieving this goal.  It is vital for parents to be partners in their child’s education. We work with thousands of teachers, everyday. Here is what they shared with us when we asked how parents can be more involved in the teaching and learning process:

Parents get involved in the classroom.3 easy steps to help parents get involved

  1. Ask for regular feedback on how well your child is performing in class from their teacher. Maybe this means a monthly email. Maybe the teacher has a monthly newsletter. Whatever the means of communication, just make sure that you establish that desire for feedback from the beginning of the school year. 
  2. Tell your child’s teacher that it is important to know when your child is recognized for good work or behavior. Then, recognize their good performance at home, too.
  3. Open communication is the key. Make sure that your child’s teacher knows that you are ready to communicate. Remember that you don’t have to wait to hear from them. Communication is a two-way street.

When you make it clear that you want to get involved and support the teacher in your child’s education, you help build the parent-teacher relationship that is paramount to your child’s success.

A Small Gesture. A Big Outcome.

For most teachers, finding another 5-10 minutes in the schedule to make a positive phone call to a parent can be difficult. Some teachers may even be reluctant to call a parent, knowing most parents are busy.  One school principal told us that she challenges her teachers to make five positive phone calls home per week. That way, each parent is contacted once a semester. That extra 5 – 10 minutes makes a huge difference.

The school’s score on their parent satisfaction survey increased 119%. The teachers at the school reported that the calls hold great value to both them and the parents. What a win!

It all ties back to that number one goal: when parents and teachers collaborate, students achieve greater results. Isn’t that what it’s really all about?

Featured Image: Getting Smart • Additional Image: edutopia

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