Students Recognize Learning Gaps During “Meeting of the Minds”

When students don’t have benchmarks to compare their work, there’s no opportunity for feedback until their work is reviewed by the teacher. If given the opportunity, students have the potential to recognize their own learning gaps through “Meeting of the Minds.”Students recognize learning gaps

Why hold “Meeting of the Minds?”

Students want to succeed whether they show it or not. “Meeting of the Minds” are a great way for students to see their learning gaps before they are given a grade. Students conduct their “Meeting of the Minds” by using examples and non examples of strong and weak work. During the meeting students review and assess examples and non examples of work given to them. We suggest not using the work of other students in their class. The goal is for students to review the work samples, not evaluate the quality of work by other students.

How do students recognize their learning gaps?

Using assessment criteria and parameters provided, students work together and discuss the work samples. The assigned group leader facilitates the discussion using a plus and minus chart. Students list the positive aspects under the plus section and the areas that need improvement under the minus section. Each group discusses the pluses and minuses of each work sample. The group then uses the plus/minus data for each work sample to place the samples in high, middle, or low performance categories. Leaders try to get group consensus to come to a “Meeting of the Minds.” They are responsible for presenting the overall ratings of the samples and using the plus/minus data to explain why the groups made their decisions.

This exercise pushes students to notice the differences between high, middle, and low performance work. While providing examples, students have benchmarks to compare their work. They can give themselves feedback on whether their work is high performing or not. If need be, they can go back and alter their work to make sure it meets the standards.

 

Featured Image: edutopia • Additional Image: US Department of Education • Resource: Who’s Engaged? Book

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